Bill McKibben

Bill McKibben

Bill McKibben is the Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury College and co-founder of 350.org. His most recent book is Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet.

Articles by this author

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Saturday, March 5, 2016 - 11:30am
The Mercury Doesn’t Lie: We’ve Hit a Troubling Climate Change Milestone
Thursday, while the nation debated the relative size of Republican genitalia, something truly awful happened. Across the northern hemisphere, the temperature, if only for a few hours, apparently crossed a line: it was more than two degrees Celsius above “normal” for the first time in recorded...
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Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 10:00am
It's Not Just What Exxon Did, It's What It's Doing
Here’s the story so far. We have the chief legal representatives of the eighth and 16th largest economies on Earth (California and New York) probing the biggest fossil fuel company on Earth (ExxonMobil), while both Democratic presidential candidates are demanding that the federal Department of...
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Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 10:30am
Why We Need to Keep 80 Percent of Fossil Fuels in the Ground
Physics can impose a bracing clarity on the normally murky world of politics. It can make things simple. Not easy, but simple. We have to attack this problem from both ends, going after supply as well as demand. Most of the time, public policy is a series of trade-offs: higher taxes or fewer...
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Monday, February 8, 2016 - 3:00pm
Getting Change Wrong
In the mounting, panicky attempts of elites to derail the Sanders candidacy, one strand dominates. You find it woven through every sage piece from the old-school pundits of the Times and the hip insider websites like Vox. Yes, they say, he's saying some useful things. But he can't really make them...
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Tuesday, January 26, 2016 - 12:30pm
Bernie Sanders Refuses to Melt
Bernie Sanders keeps refusing to run the way that the pundits think he should -- that's what makes this primary so interesting and perhaps a turning point in American politics. You could see it last night in the Democratic town hall. Before they let, you know, sensible people ask questions, there...
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Tuesday, January 19, 2016 - 10:00am
Night of the Living Dead, Climate Change-Style
When I was a kid, I was creepily fascinated by the wrongheaded idea, current in my grade school, that your hair and your fingernails kept growing after you died. The lesson seemed to be that it was hard to kill something off -- if it wanted to keep going. Something similar is happening right now...
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Saturday, November 14, 2015 - 1:30pm
Beyond Keystone: Why Climate Movement Must Keep Heat On
The key passage — the forward-looking passage — of President Obama’s speech last week rejecting the Keystone XL pipeline came right at the end, after he rehashed all the arguments about jobs and gas prices that had been litigated endlessly over the last few years. “Ultimately,” he said, “if we’re...
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Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 2:30pm
Exxon's Climate Lie: 'No Corporation Has Ever Done Anything This Big or Bad'
I’m well aware that with Paris looming it’s time to be hopeful, and I’m willing to try. Even amid the record heat and flooding of the present, there are good signs for the future in the rising climate movement and the falling cost of solar. But before we get to past and present there’s some past to...
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Monday, August 31, 2015 - 10:30am
Why the Earth Is Heating So Fast: On the Dangerous Difference Between Science and Political Science
President Obama is visiting Alaska this week — a territory changing as rapidly as any on earth thanks to global warming. He’s talking constantly about the danger that climate change poses to the planet (a welcome development given that he managed to go through virtually the entire 2012 election...
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Friday, August 21, 2015 - 12:30pm
Picturing the End of Fossil Fuels
When they say a picture is worth a thousand words, writers rebel (or they write 1,500 words). I mean, pictures are great, but they can’t get across complicated concepts. Except when they can. Which would be the summer of 2015, on two separate occasions. Early in the summer, on the West Coast of the...
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