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Wednesday, May 6, 2015
Ethan Cox
What Does the NDP’s Stunning Alberta Win Mean for Stephen Harper?
In a stunning turn of events Tuesday, the Alberta NDP swept to power with a majority government in Canada’s most conservative province. As the dust settles on a campaign that seems to change...
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Russell Brand
Democracy Is For Life, Not Just Elections
A mate who I trust said to me: "You know what this election boils down to? Who do you want to be protesting against on May 8th? Or whenever they finish counting, negotiating and posturing? David...
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Nathalie Baptiste
Nonviolence for Whom?
Ferguson. New York. Baltimore. As cities erupt after decades of oppression and violence at the hands of police, calls for nonviolence can be deafening. “Violence isn’t the answer,” the moralists...
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LeeAnn Hall
From Rage to Reform
Another city just erupted in rage in response to a police killing. After a week of peaceful protests following the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, “Charm City” was in flames. The authorities...
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Alex Scrivener
The World: An Issue Missing from UK Election Campaign
The general election campaign so far has been a miserable and myopic affair, even by the already low standards set by previous contests. Go down an average street across the UK and you’d be hard...
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George Monbiot
There Are Issues That Really Matter at This Election. But Britain’s Media Are Ignoring Them
Political coverage is never more trivial or evanescent than during an election. Where we might hope for enlightenment about the issues on which we will vote, we find gossip about the habits and style...
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Chelsea Manning
We're Citizens, Not Subjects. We Have the Right to Criticize Government without Fear
When freedom of information and transparency are stifled, then bad decisions are often made and heartbreaking tragedies occur – too often on a breathtaking scale that can leave societies wondering:...
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Juan Cole
“Killing Me Softly” in Palestine: Lauryn Hill Cancels Israel Concert under BDS Pressure
In another sign that Israeli prime minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s far-right nationalism is turning Israel into a pariah state, pop star Lauryn Hill has cancelled a planned concert outside Tel Aviv ...
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David Climenhaga
Pinch Me! Am I dreaming? Canada's 'Most Conservative' Province Elects an NDP Majority
Well, how d'ya like them oranges? Alberta New Democratic Party, 53 seats; Wildrose Party, 20; Progressive Conservative Party, 11; Alberta Liberal Party, 1; Alberta Party, 1! And that Progressive...
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Ole Hendrickson
From the Grid to Energy Democracy: Making the RenewablesTransition
When Naomi Klein spoke about her book This Changes Everything at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles in September 2014 , she was asked if she agrees with James Hansen's support for nuclear power. She...
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Rev. Lennox Yearwood Jr.
How We Reach Critical Mass to Stop Climate Chaos
This upcoming weekend at the University of the District of Columbia Law School, Bill McKibben , Dr. Michael Dorsey, Lester Brown , Professor Mark Jacobson, Mustafa Ali from the U.S. Environmental...
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Isaiah Poole
Study Finds Right-Wing Tax Voodoo Doesn’t Work
“The effects of state tax policy on economic growth, entrepreneurship, and employment remain controversial,” begins the abstract of a study of state tax policy just released by the Brookings/Urban...
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Tom Engelhardt
The Militarization of American Streets
In the part of Baltimore hardest hit by the recent riots and arson, more than a third of families live in poverty, median income is $24,000, the unemployment rate is over 50% , some areas burnt out...
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Tuesday, May 5, 2015
Katrina vanden Heuvel
The Enduring Shame of 'Separate and Unequal'
In July 1966, James Baldwin published “A Report from Occupied Territory,” a despairing essay in The Nation contemplating race relations in Harlem and other American cities. Describing the deep sense...
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Antonia Zerbisias
Omar Khadr's Road to Freedom
Nobody was surprised when the Canadian government announced on April 24 that it would again dip into the public purse to keep its most prominent political prisoner behind bars. That morning, Justice...
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Gareth Porter
The Media Misses the Point on ‘Proxy War’
The term “proxy war” has experienced a new popularity in stories on the Middle East. Various news sources began using the term to describe the conflict in Yemen immediately, as if on cue, after Saudi...
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John Kiriakou
Letter to Loretto
John Kiriakou is a former CIA officer. Back in 2007, he became the first U.S. government official to confirm — and condemn — the practice of torture by CIA interrogators. After a drawn-out legal...
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Mike Rispoli
Arrests in Baltimore Highlight Need to Protect the Right to Record
Since the protests began over Freddie Gray’s arrest and subsequent death at the hands of police, at least three journalists in Baltimore have been attacked or arrested for documenting police activity...
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Josh Levy
Facebook’s Internet.org Isn’t the Internet, It’s Facebooknet
This week Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced that Internet.org , its marquee project to “connect two-thirds of the world that don’t have internet access,” is now inviting any website or service...
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David Zurawik
It Is Not OK for Fox to Get It So Wrong in Baltimore Monday
Given its performance in Baltimore, I am starting to wonder if maybe Fox News should only do opinion and stay away from covering challenging news stories like the one still playing out on the streets...
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Michael Gould-Wartofsky
The Wars Come Home: A Five-Step Guide to the Police Repression of Protest from Ferguson to Baltimore and Beyond
Last week, as Baltimore braced for renewed protests over the death of Freddie Gray , the Baltimore Police Department (BPD) prepared for battle. With state-of-the-art surveillance of local teenagers’...
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Robert Fisk
Who Is Bombing Who in the Middle East?
Let me try to get this right. The Saudis are bombing Yemen because they fear the Shia Houthis are working for the Iranians. The Saudis are also bombing Isis in Iraq and the Isis in Syria. So are the...
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Priyamvada Gopal
The Texas Shooting Should Not Distort Our View of Free Speech
The gun attack in Dallas, Texas, at a contest to draw cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, evokes memories of the January shootings at the Paris office of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo . Two...
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Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR)
For Meet the Press, Bernie Sanders Is He Who Must Not Be Named
Meet the Press host Chuck Todd can’t seem to get enough of the 2016 presidential race. Yet the one major candidate who announced he was running last week–Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, an independent...
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Marjorie Cohn
The Chickens Come Home to Roost in Baltimore
Once again, the nation watches as prosecutors deal with the killing of an unarmed black man. “[The officers] failed to establish probable cause for Mr. Gray’s arrest as no crime had been committed by...
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Bill Quigley
Alito and Scalia: Have You No Sense of Decency Sirs?
In the 1940s and 1950s, countless people in the US were being bullied and brutalized by the anti-communist scare tactics and character assassinations of Senator Joseph McCarthy . The end of the...
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Peter Dreier
Bernie Sanders' Presidential Bid Represents a Long Tradition of American Socialism
Now that Bernie Sanders has entered the contest for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination, Americans are going to hearing a lot about socialism, because the 73-year old U.S. senator from...
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Monday, May 4, 2015
Sarah Knuckey, Hina Shamsi
We Need a Full, Transparent Review of the US Targeted Killing Program
In releasing information on April 23 about a drone strike that killed two western hostages in Pakistan in January, the Obama administration demonstrated that it is able and willing to acknowledge...
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Carol Burris
Why the Movement to Opt Out of Common Core Tests is a Big Deal
New York opt-out is reverberating around the nation. The pushback against the Common Core exams caught fans of high-stakes testing off guard, with estimates of New York test refusals now exceeding...
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David Kotz
Beyond Neoliberalism Lies Opportunity for Grand Restructuring
The financial crisis of 2008 seemed at the time to herald a shift to the left in the U.S. political atmosphere. Forgetting the decades of free-market preaching, the government raced to bail out the...
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Uzair J. Kayani, Sikander Shah
Drone Strikes Raise Specter of Lives We Grieve and Lives We Don’t
President Obama announced last month that a drone strike in Pakistan in January killed two Western hostages: Warren Weinstein, an American, and Giovanni Lo Porto, an Italian. The White House promised...
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Randall Amster
Gray’s Life Matters
For many of us on an academic calendar, which generally runs from August to May, it did not escape notice that this past year was bracketed by events in Ferguson on the front end and Baltimore on the...
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Gareth Porter
Why Iran Must Remain a US Enemy
Since the start of the US nuclear negotiations with Iran, both Israeli and Saudi officials have indulged in highly publicized handwringing over their belief that such a nuclear deal would represent a...
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Robert Reich
Trans Pacific Trickle-Down Economics
Have we learned nothing from thirty years of failed trickle-down economics? By now we should know that when big corporations, Wall Street, and the wealthy get special goodies, the rest of us get...
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Chris Hedges
Make the Rich Panic
It does not matter to the corporate rich who wins the presidential election. It does not matter who is elected to Congress. The rich have the power. They throw money at their favorites the way a...
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Tom Engelhardt
Counting the Dead in the Age of Drone Terrorism
In the twenty-first-century world of drone warfare, one question with two aspects reigns supreme: Who counts? In Washington, the answers are the same: We don’t count and they don’t count. The Obama...
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Laura Flanders
The Missing Millions in Prison Aren’t Missing, We Are.
It’s becoming popular in the media to talk about the missing millions-- the 1.5 million African American men in their prime who are missing from civic life. Those millions, it’s explained , are...
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Paul Buchheit
The Five-Step Process to Privatize Everything
Law enforcement, education, health care, water management, government itself -- all have been or are being privatized. People with money get the best of each service. At the heart of privatization is...
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Sunday, May 3, 2015
Steven Singer
A Lesson in Resistance: The Baltimore Uprising Comes to my Classroom
There was anger in the air. You could almost taste it. The children filing into the classroom were mumbling to each other, gesticulating violently, pointing fingers. And out of all that jumbled noise...
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David Suzuki
Saving the Monarch Butterfly
The monarch butterfly is a wonderful creature with an amazing story . In late summer, monarchs in southern Canada and the U.S. northeast take flight, travelling over 5,000 kilometres to alpine...
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Rae Breaux
Rising Up, in Baltimore and Beyond
If we want climate justice — not just adaptation to or even mitigation of climate change — then it’s important to understand the structural drivers of the crisis. I’m thinking about those drivers...
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Michael Winship
Kent State and the Frisbee Revolution
Thinking I’d write a piece on the 45th anniversary of the deaths at Kent State, I realized I’d already written it – five years ago. There’s not a lot I’d change in this, although there’s some comfort...
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Karl Grossman
Oil Wars: Fracking, Manipulation, and the Future of Our Energy System
Manipulation of the petroleum market is not new. John D. Rockefeller with his Standard Oil Trust mastered it between the end of the 19th and start of the 20th Century. Rockefeller and his trust...
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Saturday, May 2, 2015
Donna Smith
Brutality is Our Society's Trademark—From the Justice System to Healthcare
Over the past several weeks, we've seen so many examples of brutality played out in our cities -- and mostly our most impoverished areas -- that it isn't difficult to see why so many people are in...
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Eric Margolis
The Ghosts of Vietnam Should Haunt Us, But Don't
It was 1967. The war in Vietnam was raging. I was 24 years old, just out of graduate school in New York City. Cambridge University had accepted me to do a doctorate history. But no. In a burst of...
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Rania Khalek
Europe’s Border Policy is Designed to Push Refugees into the Sea
Shortly before a huge migrant boat disaster early this month, The Sun , a daily paper owned by Rupert Murdoch, published a column by British TV star and rightwing provocateur Katie Hopkins calling...
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Mary Anne Hitt
Renewable Energy Champions vs. Polluter-Backed Politicians
Spring time means baseball season for so many—a nice evening out at the ballpark with a hot dog, peanuts and a cold beverage. We all love a home run, except when it’s against our team, of course. So...
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Ray McGovern
The Lasting Pain from Vietnam Silence
Ecclesiastes says there is a time to be silent and a time to speak. The fortieth anniversary of the ugly end of the U.S. adventure in Vietnam is a time to speak – and especially of the squandered...
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Frida Berrigan
Baltimore is Burning—Not Just in Flames, But With a Righteous Anger
Baltimore is my home town — the birth place of Jonah House, a Christian nonviolent resistance community founded by my parents, Phil Berrigan and Elizabeth McAlister. Those places that the whole world...
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Jay Walljasper
Little Town on the Prairie Steps It Up
It’s like a small-town scene from Norman Rockwell, updated for the 21 st Century. A Latino family strolls leisurely through the park, immersed in conversation. Coming up fast behind is a blonde woman...
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Elizabeth Oriel
What Ails this Country? Bernie Sanders Will Ask You
“What is government if not a relationship with the people?”–resident of Concord, Massachusetts “I think the amount of influence I have, or anyone has, as a member of the public basically comes from...
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Christopher Brauchli
Learning from Limbaugh
“At length I recollected the thoughtless saying of a great princess, who, on being informed that the country people had no bread, replied, ‘Let them eat cake.’’” Jean Jacques Rousseau, Confessions In...
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Ralph Nader
Obama: Debate Senator Warren on Global Economic Pact
President Barack Obama The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20500 Dear President Obama: You have taken a strong across-the-board position favoring the Trans-Pacific Partnership...
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Friday, May 1, 2015
Todd Paglia
Oil Trains Too Fast, New Safety Rules Too Slow
In the first three months of 2015 four oil train accidents sent emergency responders scrambling, crude oil spilling into drinking water supplies, and fireballs blasting into the sky. The string of...
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Michelle Chen
Baltimore’s Inescapable Inequality
Freddie Gray died after he tried to run from the police. Some might think he was wrong for provoking a chase, but the thousands of people now protesting across the country know that getting killed as...
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Rainey Reitman, Mark Jaycox
The New USA Freedom Act: A Step in the Right Direction, but More Must Be Done
A bipartisan group of congressional leaders has reintroduced the USA Freedom Act. The bill is an attempt to rein in the intelligence community's " Collect It All " strategy, and passing USA Freedom...
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Ray McGovern
The Lasting Pain from Vietnam Silence
Ecclesiastes says there is a time to be silent and a time to speak. The fortieth anniversary of the ugly end of the U.S. adventure in Vietnam is a time to speak – and especially of the squandered...
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Dave Johnson
Writing The New Rules For The 21st Century – In Secret?
The great Thomas “Mustache” Friedman is perhaps best known for encouraging the invasion of Iraq (and subsequent resistance insurgency, civil war, thousands of American and hundreds of thousands of...
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Robert Borosage
The Sanders Challenge
Tweeting that “America needs a political revolution,” Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders threw himself Thursday into the race for the Democratic nomination for the presidency. Sanders is in many ways the...
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Tom Gallagher
The Significance of Bernie Sanders' Decision to Enter the Democratic Primaries
Why has the longest serving independent member of Congress in American history just announced that he will seek the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination? Simply put, because Senator Bernie...
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Molly Selvin
A New Model in the Fight for Abortion Rights
Republicans insist that they care deeply about American families. But taken together, their actions in recent months—along with their inaction—on a string of modest and long-overdue proposals to...
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Sean Thomas-Breitfeld
#BlackWorkersMatter
Two weeks ago, New York City joined ten other states and municipalities in banning the use of credit checks in hiring . Like most forms of 21 st century discrimination, weighing the credit histories...
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Robert Reich
The Political Roots of Widening Inequality
For the past quarter-century I’ve offered in articles, books, and lectures an explanation for why average working people in advanced nations like the United States have failed to gain ground and are...
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Sonali Kolhatkar
Cutting Through Police Propaganda in Baltimore
On Monday, the day 25-year-old Freddie Gray was laid to rest in Baltimore after fatal injuries sustained during an arrest, The Daily Beast reported that members of the Crips and Bloods had declared a...
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Thursday, April 30, 2015
Bill McKibben
Why the Planet Is Happy That Bernie Sanders Is Running for President
After lunch, right about the time that Bernie Sanders was actually announcing his run for president, I went for a walk in the woods, and polled three chickadees, two wild turkeys, one vernal pool of...
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Amy Goodman
A Century of Women Working for Peace
THE HAGUE, Netherlands—One hundred years ago, more than 1,000 women gathered here in The Hague during World War I, demanding peace. Britain denied passports to more than 120 women, forbidding them...
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Peniel Joseph
Hillary Clinton and the Urban Rebellion
The immediate policy response to urban rebellion in Baltimore on Monday night came, somewhat surprisingly, from former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who just launched her campaign for the 2016...
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Michael Winship
Populism2015: Construction Crew for Democracy
To the blare of sounding brass and booming drums, some 800 activists and community organizers from around the country recently converged on Washington, DC. We are living, breathing proof, they...
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Andrew Lam
Vietnam War 40 Years Later: Capitalism Trumps Ideology
Forty years have passed since the Vietnam War ended, and a parade was staged in Ho Chi Minh City, formally Saigon, to commemorate that date. Yet despite the fanfare debates rage on both sides of the...
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Iraq Veterans Against the War
Stand Down: A Message to the Maryland National Guard
Iraq Veterans Against the War (IVAW), a national group of Post 9/11 veterans, call on the Maryland National Guard to stand down from their mobilization to Baltimore. As 1,000 soldiers currently...
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Valerie Bell
After Baltimore, a Call to Reclaim Mother’s Day
It’s hard for me to celebrate on Mother’s Day. I feel the absence of my 23-year-old son, Sean Elijah Bell, who was killed on November 25, 2006. He was out celebrating at his own bachelor party with...
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Robert C. Koehler
The Moment of Silence
This is big. A new civil rights era births itself in terrible pain. Black men die, over and over. I can only hope that peace is the result, serious peace, bigger than new laws, bigger than better...
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Sandy Tolan
Music at the Gates and the One-State Conundrum in Palestine
The SUV slows as it approaches a military kiosk at a break in a dull gray wall. Inside, Ramzi Aburedwan , a Palestinian musician, prepares his documents for the Israeli soldier standing guard. On the...
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Dave Lindorff
Celebrating the End of One War, and Witnessing the Start of a New One Here at Home
It was 40 years ago today that the last troops from America’s criminal war against the people of Vietnam scurried ignominiously onto a helicopter on the roof of the US Embassy in Saigon (now Ho Chi...
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Jamelle Bouie
The Deep, Troubling Roots of Baltimore’s Decline
BALTIMORE—“We want people to register to vote, because that’s where the change is made,” said State Sen. Catherine Pugh , standing near the smoldering remains of the CVS on North Avenue, and handing...
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Isaiah Poole
Baltimore’s Plight Shows Why A Good Jobs Policy Is Way Overdue
The nation is now seeing that there is a broader story to be told about the roots of the violence that broke out in Baltimore this week. In addition to the mistreatment of African Americans by police...
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Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Matt Taibbi
Give 'Em Hell, Bernie
Many years ago I pitched a magazine editor on a story about Bernie Sanders, then a congressman from Vermont, who'd agreed to something extraordinary – he agreed to let me, a reporter, stick next to...
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Lindsay Koshgarian
National Defense Authorization Act: Five Things You Should Know
Today – all day and quite possibly into the night -- the House Armed Services Committee is marking up the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). But what is the NDAA, and why should we care? Here...
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Faiza Patel
NSA Data Collection Program Must End
The Senate’s Republican leadership has convinced itself that the revelations of former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden were just a bad dream. Last week, Senate Majority Leader...
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Ben Lilliston
Corporate Cash vs The Rest of Us on Fast Track
The corporate lobbying frenzy is heating up as Fast Track trade authority starts to make its way through Congress. The bill’s passage, with only one hearing and a tight timeline, is being greased by...
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Deepak Bhargava
Putting Families First: Good Jobs for All
On a December morning nearly 60 years ago, Rosa Parks refused to yield her seat to a white man on a public bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Her decision wasn’t made on a whim; and the ensuing arrest,...
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Juan Cole
Iran Calls for Nuclear Disarmament by US, Israel, World
At a summit on Monday, Iranian foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif turned the tables on the countries demanding that Iran keep its nuclear program for solely civilian, electricity generation. Zarif...
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Katrina vanden Heuvel
A Progressive’s Lament about the Trans-Pacific Partnership
It has come to this. To sell his trade treaty — specifically the fast-track trade authority that would grease the skids for passage of the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement (TPP), President Obama...
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Shepherd Bliss
Big Wine Fails to Dry Farm During California's Relentless Drought
California Governor Jerry Brown spent this year’s Earth Day at the elite Iron Horse Winery in the Sebastopol countryside. It was a great photo opportunity and promotion for the winery. Iron Horse is...
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Ajamu Baraka
Baltimore and the Human Right to Resistance: Rejecting the Framework of the Oppressor
Anti-Black racism, always just beneath the surface of polite racial discourse in the U.S., has exploded in reaction to the resistance of black youth to another brutal murder by the agents of this...
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John Nichols
Bernie Sanders Readies a ‘Which Side Are You On?’ Presidential Bid
Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders told The Nation more than a year ago that he was “prepared to run for president of the United States.” But he said he had to determine whether grassroots activists were...
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Jim Naureckas
'Why So Much Anger?': If You Don’t Know, Washington Post Won’t Tell You
The Washington Post ( 4/28/15 ) offers: A Freddie Gray Primer: Who Was He, How Did He Die, Why Is There So Much Anger? The “who was he” part comes from the “ no angel ” school of journalism—stressing...
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Tuesday, April 28, 2015
Robert Parry
Syria’s Nightmarish Narrative
The Saudi-Israeli alliance , in league with other hard-line Sunni countries, is helping Al-Qaeda affiliates advance toward gaining either victory or at least safe havens in Syria and Yemen,...
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Shawn Gude
Why Baltimore Rebelled
Days before social unrest in Baltimore reached levels unseen in decades, Dan Rodricks, the Baltimore Sun ‘s resident liberal columnist, painted a picture of Saturday afternoon’s march against police...
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Bill Quigley
The "Shocking" Statistics of Racial Disparity in Baltimore
Were you shocked at the disruption in Baltimore? What is more shocking is daily life in Baltimore , a city of 622,000 which is 63 percent African American. Here are ten numbers that tell some of the...
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Ta-Nehisi Coates
Nonviolence as Compliance
Rioting broke out on Monday in Baltimore—an angry response to the death of Freddie Gray, a death my native city seems powerless to explain. Gray did not die mysteriously in some back alley but in the...
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Dave Johnson
How TPP Increases Corporate Power vs. Government — And Us
Power is the ability to control, to tell what to do, to get your way. Corporations have a lot of power over working people in our country now, and they might be about to get a lot more. The...
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Andrew Cockburn
The Kingpin Strategy: Assassination as Policy in Washington and How It Failed, 1990-2015
As the war on terror nears its 14th anniversary -- a war we seem to be losing, given jihadist advances in Iraq, Syria, and Yemen -- the U.S. sticks stolidly to its strategy of “high-value targeting...
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Tom Engelhardt
Assassination, American-Style: James Bond or the Three Stooges?
No one can claim that plotting assassination is new to Washington or that, in the past, American leaders and the CIA didn’t aim high: the Congo’s Patrice Lumumba , Cuba’s Fidel Castro , the Dominican...
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Sasha Stashwick
With Tyson Pledge, Antibiotic Stewardship Is Looking Like the New Normal in the Chicken Industry
Tyson Foods, the nation's largest processor of meat and poultry, announced today that it will eliminate the use human antibiotics for raising chickens in its US operations by September 2017, while...
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Robert Reich
Why So Many Americans Feel So Powerless
A security guard recently told me he didn’t know how much he’d be earning from week to week because his firm kept changing his schedule and his pay. “They just don’t care,” he said. A traveler I met...
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Shaun La
Police and 'Black Baltimore'
The footage involving Freddie Gray and the Baltimore City cops brought it all back. Growing up in 1990s Baltimore, some of the cops would use Black Baltimore as a playground to do whatever they...
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Belén Fernández
Baltimore’s Disgrace Is History of Police Violence
After Saturday’s full day of peaceful protests in Baltimore calling for justice for Freddie Gray — the 25-year-old who recently died of a spinal injury suffered while in police custody — some...
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Marjorie Cohn
Challenging American Exceptionalism
President Barack Obama stood behind the podium and apologized for inadvertently killing two Western hostages - including one American - during a drone strike in Pakistan. Obama said, “one of the...
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Monday, April 27, 2015
Nick Dearden
Should Aid Money be Used as a Tool for Expanding Free Markets?
Ask a particularly extreme proponent of the free market how they see the future, and they might conjure up schools run by Coca-Cola and education programmes administered by Price Waterhouse Coopers...
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