Robert Reich

Robert Reich, one of the nation’s leading experts on work and the economy, is Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy at the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley. He has served in three national administrations, most recently as secretary of labor under President Bill Clinton. Time Magazine has named him one of the ten most effective cabinet secretaries of the last century. He has written thirteen books, including his latest best-seller, Aftershock: The Next Economy and America’s Future; The Work of Nations; Locked in the Cabinet; Supercapitalism; and his newest, Beyond Outrage. His syndicated columns, television appearances, and public radio commentaries reach millions of people each week. He is also a founding editor of the American Prospect magazine, and Chairman of the citizen’s group Common Cause. His widely-read blog can be found at www.robertreich.org.

Articles by this author

Views
Monday, May 25, 2015 - 2:45pm
Whatever Happened to Antitrust?
Last week’s settlement between the Justice Department and five giant banks reveals the appalling weakness of modern antitrust. The banks had engaged in the biggest price-fixing conspiracy in modern history. Their self-described “cartel” used an exclusive electronic chat room and coded language to...
Read more
Views
Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 6:15am
The Revolt of Small Business Republicans
Can it be that America’s small businesses are finally waking up to the fact they’re being screwed by big businesses? For years, small-business groups such as the National Federation of Independent Businesses have lined up behind big businesses lobbies. They’ve contributed to the same Republican...
Read more
Views
Monday, May 4, 2015 - 7:00am
Trans Pacific Trickle-Down Economics
Have we learned nothing from thirty years of failed trickle-down economics? By now we should know that when big corporations, Wall Street, and the wealthy get special goodies, the rest of us get shafted. The Reagan and George W. Bush tax cuts of 1981, 2001, and 2003, respectively, were sold to...
Read more
Views
Friday, May 1, 2015 - 7:30am
The Political Roots of Widening Inequality
For the past quarter-century I’ve offered in articles, books, and lectures an explanation for why average working people in advanced nations like the United States have failed to gain ground and are under increasing economic stress: Put simply, globalization and technological change have made most...
Read more
Views
Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 9:00am
Why So Many Americans Feel So Powerless
A security guard recently told me he didn’t know how much he’d be earning from week to week because his firm kept changing his schedule and his pay. “They just don’t care,” he said. A traveler I met in the Dallas Fort-Worth Airport last week said she’d been there eight hours but the airline...
Read more
Views
Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 8:15am
How the New Flexible Economy is Making Workers’ Lives Hell
These days it’s not unusual for someone on the way to work to receive a text message from her employer saying she’s not needed right then. Although she’s already found someone to pick up her kid from school and arranged for childcare, the work is no longer available and she won’t be paid for it...
Read more
Views
Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 11:15am
The Big Chill: How Big Money Is Buying Off Criticism of Big Money
Not long ago I was asked to speak to a religious congregation about widening inequality. Shortly before I began, the head of the congregation asked that I not advocate raising taxes on the wealthy. He said he didn’t want to antagonize certain wealthy congregants on whose generosity the congregation...
Read more
Views
Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 7:00am
The Rise of the Working Poor and the Non-Working Rich
Many believe that poor people deserve to be poor because they’re lazy. As Speaker John Boehner has said , the poor have a notion that “I really don’t have to work. I don’t really want to do this. I think I’d rather just sit around.” In reality, a large and growing share of the nation’s poor work...
Read more
Views
Tuesday, March 17, 2015 - 7:00am
The 'iEverything' and the Redistributional Imperative
It’s now possible to sell a new product to hundreds of millions of people without needing many, if any, workers to produce or distribute it. At its prime in 1988, Kodak, the iconic American photography company, had 145,000 employees . In 2012, Kodak filed for bankruptcy. The same year Kodak went...
Read more
Views
Monday, March 9, 2015 - 9:15am
The Conundrum of Corporation and Nation
The U.S. economy is picking up steam but most Americans aren't feeling it. By contrast, most European economies are still in bad shape, but most Europeans are doing relatively well. What's behind this? Two big facts. First, American corporations exert far more political influence in the United...
Read more

Pages